healthy-eating

Simple Tips for Everyday Healthy Eating

While it’s a given that we all need balanced nutrition for good health, it can sometimes be challenging to put this into daily practice. For many women, the hectic daily routine of work and family means that optimal food choices are put on the back burner. It can be overwhelming to think about making sweeping changes to your diet. The reality is that even small improvements can make a big difference. It’s also true that changes that turn into healthy eating habits are developed over time.

March is National Nutrition Month, and this year’s theme is Put Your Best Fork Forward – a reminder that every bite counts. With every meal or snack, you can choose a nutritious option. The following are some simple ideas that can help you eat better each day.

Choose a color a day for fruits and vegetables

With many healthy eating options to select from, one way to narrow down your choices is to focus on one color of produce for each day. For example, on Monday, choose from the bounty of red options, including peppers, apples, berries and potatoes. When you begin to make choices based on the amazing spectrum of colorful fruits and vegetables, you can enjoy old favorites and experiment with new options, too.

Choose more whole grains

Eating grains, particularly whole grains, is an important part of healthy eating. Grains provide important nutrients, including fiber, several B vitamins and minerals, such as iron, magnesium and selenium. By swapping out white bread, biscuits, and pasta for whole grain alternatives, you may also help reduce blood cholesterol levels and your chance of developing heart disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Include low-fat dairy products or dairy alternatives

When possible, choose fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt and cheese. For those who are lactose intolerant, there are lactose-free products available, as well as calcium-fortified, plant-based milk substitutes. Other beneficial sources of calcium to consider include sardines, leafy greens, and some types of beans.

Watch your portions

How much we eat is as important as what we eat. Americans are eating larger portions than ever, and this is a big contributor to the growing epidemic of obesity in the United States. Not sure how many calories you’re taking in each day? Check out the USDA’s SuperTracker. This tool can help you evaluate the foods you eat and compare them to your nutrition targets.

Keep healthy snacks on hand

You’ll reduce your risk of grabbing for a candy bar or other less-than-healthy snack if you have more nutritious options available. Easy options include nuts, protein bars and plain yogurt.

Find activities you enjoy

You don’t have to be training for a marathon to get sufficient physical activity. The key is finding activities that you like to do on a regular basis. A simple walk each day is a great place to start. Consider partnering with a buddy who can keep you “on track.”

Avoid fast weight loss diets

Fad diets may help you take off a few pounds, but it’s unlikely that the weight loss will last.

“Fad diets just don’t work,” says Marissa Licata, MS, RD, CDN, Registered Dietitian, Katz Institute for Women’s Health. “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is. Choose a weight loss plan that teaches you how to make long-term positive changes. Changes to behavior and the type of food you choose is where you’ll find long-term success.”

Get Expert Advice and Guidance

A licensed dietitian can help you improve your health and manage diseases. By working with you to create personalized meal planning, you gain the tools you need to make sound nutritional choices.

Want to learn more about resources to support your nutritional needs? At the Katz Institute for Women’s Health, we’re here to answer your questions. Call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.

Get Heart Healthy in 2017

Take Charge of Your Heart Health

When it comes to women’s health, it’s a fact that breast cancer gets far more attention than heart disease. Yet, five times as many women die from heart disease as breast cancer each year. Because heart disease has historically been considered a “man’s disease,” many women lack an awareness of their potential risk.

According to the American Heart Association, cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke, kills approximately 500,000 women in the United States each year. This number exceeds the next seven causes of death combined, including all cancers. Although these statistics are alarming, there is some good news, too. The death rate from heart disease has decreased by 30 percent in the United States since 1998. This drop is due in large part to greater awareness and healthcare providers’ increasing focus on cardiac screening as part of primary care for women.

What Can You Do?

Although 90 percent of women have at least one risk factor for developing heart disease, 80 percent of current cases are preventable. There are many ways you can lower your risk. And, by doing so, you can improve your overall health and feel great, too! The following are a few simple strategies to help you proactively lower your risk of a cardiac event.

Move More

While going to the gym or participating in a regular exercise class is a great way to lower your risk of a heart attack or stroke, there are many ways to incorporate physical activity into your daily routine. It can be as simple as taking a brisk walk, dancing or riding your bike. The key is to aim for some amount of physical activity 30 minutes per day.

Manage Your Stress

Heart disease is more common in women who experience chronic stress. Although it’s impossible to remove all sources of daily stress, there are ways to manage your stress, including limiting exposure to triggers that bring on stressful feelings. For example, if you’re feeling short on time, you may want to re-prioritize your schedule. Seeking the support of a trusted friend, family member or counselor can provide comfort if you’re anxious about a relationship or situation. Sometimes, it’s just a matter of changing your perspective to better cope with daily stressful events.

In addition, there are good ways to relieve your stress. Exercise and yoga are natural remedies for anxiety and stress that release powerful endorphins in the brain which reduce pain and lift your mood. Making time to connect with people around you and spending time outside can also offer significant mood-boosting benefits.

Find the Right Doctor

Your primary healthcare provider should be someone you trust and can talk to without embarrassment or anxiety. When it comes to your heart, your doctor can be a primary source of information and support to ensure you’re doing all you can to protect your health.

“I recommend choosing a doctor who you can relate to like a trusted confidant or friend,” says Dr. Stacey Rosen, Vice President, Women’s Health, Katz Institute for Women’s Health. “By developing a rapport, you can gain the insights and motivation you need to lower your risk of developing heart disease.”

Know your Numbers

Hypertension, high cholesterol and elevated blood sugar are all easy to diagnose but can often get overlooked in women who don’t obtain regular checkups. Learning your numbers is the first step in controlling heart disease before symptoms develop.

Do you want to learn more about women’s heart health prevention? At Katz Institute for Women’s Health, we’re here to answer your questions. Call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.

Managing diabetes

Managing Diabetes – Don’t Let Sweetness Be Your Weakness

Many consider diabetes to be like a roller coaster with significant ups and downs, but you have the choice to be fearful or to enjoy the ride. When it comes to diabetes management, living a productive happy life is possible, but it requires a consistent effort to keep your blood sugar levels in check by making healthy lifestyle decisions.

Getting Screened for Diabetes

The first step is diagnosis. Nearly one-third of those with diabetes don’t know they have the condition (source: CDC). Because there are often few or no symptoms of type 2 diabetes, early screening is essential to avoid developing complications of the disease which include damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart and blood vessels. Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) need to be screened every three years. All adults need to be screened at 40. For those who have diabetes risk factors, screening should start at an earlier age and happen more frequently (USPTF). Risk factors include:

  • Obesity or being overweight
  • Family history of diabetes (parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles or siblings with the condition)
  • Physical inactivity
  • Race/ethnicity (African-American, Hispanic-American, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander)
  • High blood pressure (equal to or greater than 140/90)
  • History of impaired fasting glucose or gestational diabetes

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, it’s important to know you’re not alone. Nearly 30 million Americans have diabetes, and another 86 million have prediabetes with blood sugar levels that are higher than normal (source: CDC).

Healthy Eating for Life

Well-balanced meals are fundamental in keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor and for living a long, healthy life – whether or not you have been diagnosed with diabetes. This requires knowing how food impacts your blood sugar levels. This includes the type, quantity and combinations of foods that you eat.

“If you are at risk of diabetes or have already received a diagnosis, having a consultation with a registered dietitian can be very beneficial in helping you on the right path,” says Marissa Licata, Registered Dietitian at Katz Institute for Women’s Health. “Diabetes isn’t just about avoiding sugar. It’s about being able to plan healthy meals, coordinating meals and medications and learning how to count carbohydrates and measure portion sizes.”

The Daily Routine

Along with eating healthy, there are other healthy lifestyle habits you can adopt which can help you manage your blood sugar levels. These include:

Exercising Regularly – When you stay active, your muscles use sugar for energy, and your body uses insulin more efficiently.

Following Medication Guidelines – Insulin and other medications may be prescribed if diet and exercise alone are not enough to manage your diabetes. Their effectiveness depends on the timing and size of their dose.

Managing Stress – Hormones produced in response to stress can cause your blood sugar levels to rise. It’s important to learn strategies for coping with stress in your everyday life.

Staying Informed – The more you know about your condition and what can affect your blood sugar levels, the better you can anticipate and manage fluctuations.

“When it comes to managing diabetes, the key is not to let it have you,” says Alyson Myers, MD, Medical Director, Inpatient Diabetes, North Shore University Hospital. “It’s vital to stay focused on day-to-day factors that affect your blood sugar levels. This means healthy eating, getting physical activity, taking prescribed medications, sticking to a regular sleep schedule and seeing your doctor on a regular basis.”

Join Us on the evening of November 16th for an important Katz Institute for Women’s Health (KIWH) Women’s Wellness event: Diabetes – Don’t Let Sweetness Be Your Weakness.

Katz Institute for Women’s Health is here to answer your questions about diabetes. Call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.

Health Tips, October 2015

1: Make Breast Self-Exam a Monthly Habit: Forty percent of diagnosed breast cancers are detected by women who feel a lump. Getting in the habit of a monthly self-exam is very important for women of all ages. While mammograms can help detect cancer before you can feel a lump, you can also be proactive by alerting your doctor if you notice any changes.

2: Get Outside and Enjoy the Season: The glorious colors of fall are all around. Before the cold winter weather strikes, take time for a daily stroll to appreciate the changing of the seasons. Along with burning calories, strengthening muscles and improving circulation, regular walking can help improve your mood, slow mental decline and even lower the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

3: Avoid the Temptation of Halloween Candy – Who isn’t tempted by Halloween candy that seems to be nearly everywhere throughout the month of October? Yet, before you reach for the candy corn or a peanut butter cup, it’s important to remember that the impact of these bite-sized treats can really add up. Just because they’re small in size doesn’t mean that they’re not loaded with calories. Avoid fall weight gain by opting for healthier options like a crisp apple or a handful of nuts.