sleep better

Strategies to Avoid the Summer Sleep Problems

Struggling with summer sleep problems? You have plenty of company! Most of us have heard of the “summer slide,” when students tend to lose math and reading skills over the summer vacation. However, academic learning isn’t the only thing that tends to slide during the warm weather months. There is also often a summer sleep slide that not only impacts children, but also plenty of adults.

Maintain a Consistent Bedtime Routine

Summer vacations and the freedom from the weekday school routine can lead to later bedtimes and disrupted sleep schedules for everyone in the family. This can be a very real problem that over time results in sleep deprivation. It’s important to balance the freedom of summer break with a family’s sleep needs.

Preschoolers need 11 to 13 hours of sleep each night, and school age kids require 10.5 to 12 hours. Most adults need seven to nine hours. Ideally, keep bedtimes consistent over the summer to keep internal clocks in check.

“It’s important to maintain the same going-to-bed and wake-up times,” says Dr. Preethi Rajan of Northwell Health’s Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. “Going to bed late and sleeping in can affect the natural rhythm of our sleep. Chilldren get hyperactive and lose their ability to pay attention when their regular schedule is disrupted. Adults can feel groggy and tired through the day.”

Darken Your Bedroom

After a long, dark winter, summertime sunshine is a welcome change, but it’s not so great when it impacts sleep. Living in a region where it’s still light outside during the evening hours can make it more difficult to fall asleep. To avoid a sleep problem, keep your bedroom dark at night with light-blocking curtains or blinds, as well as maintain consistency in your sleep routine. If you find it difficult to fall asleep, don’t be tempted to grab for an electronic device to lull yourself into dreamland. Digital technology impacts cognitive stimulation and can rev up the brain, which is the opposite of what should be happening before sleep. The bedroom should be an electronic-free zone, and ideally, there should be 15 to 30 minutes of technology-free time before heading to bed.

Keep It Cool

With summer sun comes higher temperatures. A bedroom that is too warm can keep you awake at night. Falling asleep and staying asleep requires the body to lower its internal temperature. This can be more difficult if your bedroom’s temperature is not optimal. A few suggestions to keep it cool include:

  • Keep windows tightly closed if the temperature outside is hotter than indoors
  • Use a fan to circulate cool air
  • Wear light bed clothing
  • Take a cool shower or bath before getting into bed
  • Don’t exercise within several hours of your regular bedtime

Could It Be a Sleep Disorder?

Although there are temporary sleep problems that are more likely to occur during the summer, they may also indicate a larger sleep disorder. If you frequently experience any of these symptoms, it’s important to discuss them with your physician.

  • Difficulty falling or staying asleep
  • Daytime fatigue
  • Strong urge to take naps during the day
  • Irritability
  • Lack of concentration
  • Depression

Want to learn more about overcoming sleep problems? At Katz Institute for Women’s Health, we’re here to answer your questions. Call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.

Summer Safety Tips to Keep You and Your Family Safe

With warmer temperatures and children out of school, summer is the time to enjoy some rest and relaxation. It’s also when certain types of injuries and illnesses are more likely to occur. This is why it’s important to put into play some basic summer safety tips. From barbecues and swim parties to trampolines and fireworks, summer is loaded with fun, as well as opportunities to step up your safety game.

“Safety definitely begins at home,” says Ro Ennis, Assistant Vice President, Community Health and Education at the Katz Institute for Women’s Health. “By being aware of the potential risks and using some common-sense strategies, you can avoid many of the most common summertime injuries and illnesses.”

Water Safety

Swimming is a favorite summer activity for both children and adults. On average, nearly 5,000 individuals each year in the United States receive emergency care for injuries suffered in swimming pools (source: U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission). Water safety should be a top priority. This includes never leaving young children unattended near water, always swimming with a buddy and ensuring that everyone in the family learns to swim well.

Barbecue Safety

With outdoor living spaces becoming increasingly popular, more of us are investing in grills and even full outdoor kitchens. Gas and charcoal grills are ideal for creating delicious summertime meals at home, but they also increase the risk of thermal burns and home fires. For safe grilling, the grill should never be left unattended and should be placed well away from structures, including railings, fences and eaves. Children and pets should be kept at least three feet away from the grill area. Gas grill lids should always be open before lighting.

Heat and Sun Safety

Summer is all about enjoying the warm temperatures. However, on hot sunny days, it’s easy to get too much of a good thing. Overexposure to the sun can cause sunburns, as well as heat-related illness. To minimize any risk, practice proper sun protection. This includes using a sunscreen with SPF of 30 or higher, wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, staying in the shade during midday hours and avoiding small spaces, such as inside of a car, where hot temperatures can build up quickly and cause hyperthermia.

Food Safety

Food poisoning is more common during the summer months because food-borne bacteria grow quicker in hot weather. Extra care should be taken with food prepared and eaten outdoors. Use an insulated cooler filled with ice or frozen gel packs to keep foods, such as meat, summer salads and dairy products, at a safe temperature. Use separate cutting boards and utensils for raw meat and ready-to-eat items like bread, condiments and vegetables. Don’t let perishable food sit out for more than one hour in hot weather (above 90 degrees).

Insect Safety

Warm temperatures are also appealing to insects which can transmit illnesses, including West Nile virus, Lyme Disease, and encephalitis. To prevent insect bites and protect against illness, stay away from stagnant water and heavily wooded areas that can be breeding grounds for mosquitoes and ticks. Avoid perfumes and scented soaps that can attract some insects and use an insect repellent containing DEET which can help keep insects away.

Want to learn more about summer safety? At Katz Institute for Women’s Health, we’re here to answer your questions. Call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.

endometriosis

Endometriosis: Facts for Every Woman

Approximately 5 million women in North America have endometriosis. Symptoms can range from mild to severe and commonly include painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea), pelvic pain, heavy menstrual bleeding, pain during intercourse or bowel movements and infertility.

Although endometriosis is common, it’s also widely misunderstood and often misdiagnosed. Education is important to increasing awareness. We recently joined Dr. Christine Metz, Investigator at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Professor at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, for a Q&A session on the topic of endometriosis. Dr. Metz shared some valuable information and insights.

What is endometriosis?

Endometriosis is characterized by the growth of endometrial tissue or lesions outside of the uterus. These lesions can grow on the lining of the pelvis, internal organs (e.g. the outside of the uterus, ovaries, Fallopian tubes and rectum). In some women, lesions can grow on more distant areas of the body, including the diaphragm, lungs, kidneys and brain.

What causes endometriosis?

The cause of endometriosis is not completely understood. However, many researchers believe that it arises after abnormal menstrual flow where menstrual blood is carried through the fallopian tubes into the pelvic cavity instead of exiting through the vagina. Like the endometrium, which sheds monthly, endometriosis lesions bleed in response to monthly hormone fluctuations. Other factors that may influence endometriosis are genetics and environmental and immune system factors.

How is endometriosis diagnosed?

One of the most frustrating problems for patients with endometriosis is delayed diagnosis, which can take up to 10 years. The diagnosis of endometriosis requires laparoscopic surgery with pathology confirmation of the biopsy specimens. Early diagnosis by a doctor who specializes in treating endometriosis patients is important because early treatment can dramatically improve patient outcomes.

Do pain and other symptoms correlate with the severity of endometriosis?

No. Pain and other symptoms do NOT always correlate with the severity of the disease.

What are the treatments for endometriosis?

While there is no cure for endometriosis, treatments include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs and other pain relievers, hormonal contraceptives (e.g. birth control pills or vaginal rings), other hormonal agents (e.g. gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists and antagonists, androgenic agents, progestins and Danazol) and surgery to remove the lesions or the uterus (in severe cases only).

What can women do?

Researchers at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health are looking for women with and without endometriosis to participate in the ROSE (Research OutSmarts Endometriosis) research study. Our goal is to investigate the causes of endometriosis and develop non-invasive diagnostic methods and new treatments for women suffering with endometriosis. For additional information, please contact us at ROSE@northwell.edu or call 516-562-ENDO (3636).

Katz Institute for Women’s Health is also here to answer your questions about endometriosis. Call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.

prostate cancer

Prostate Cancer: What Every Woman Should Know

Just because women don’t have prostate glands doesn’t mean they shouldn’t know the facts about prostate cancer. In fact, as the gatekeepers of health for many families, women play an important role in encouraging the men in their lives to get regular prostate screenings.

“Women typically seek out healthcare more often,” says Dr. Jessica Kreshover, Urologist at the Arthur Smith Institute for Urology and Assistant Professor at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine. “Because of this, they are in a unique position to communicate the benefits of prostate cancer screening with their male family members and friends.”

The Benefits of Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

Many women are shocked to learn that prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men, and that one in six men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetime (source: American Cancer Society). Although these statistics are alarming, the news isn’t all bad. The reality is that prostate tumors are often highly treatable when they’re diagnosed at an early stage.

Yet, early stage prostate cancer typically has few or no symptoms. It is most often first detected by a digital rectal exam (DRE) followed by a blood test to measure a protein made by prostate cells, called prostate specific antigen (PSA). A doctor usually can feel whether there is any swelling or nodules on the prostate. An elevated level of PSA also is an indicator that cancer may be present.

Current Prostate Screening Guidelines

The American Urological Association recommends that men obtain a baseline PSA screening and a DRE at age 55 or age 40 if there are risk factors (African Americans and family history), with follow-up screens at intervals determined by the patient and his physician. Decisions made on screening intervals are based on multiple factors including:

  • Age
  • Ethnicity
  • Family history
  • PSA test results

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force also recently announced a new recommendation that states that men ages 55 to 69 should “make an individualized decision about prostate cancer screening with their clinician.” This was a change to a blanket recommendation in 2012 for no routine screening at any age. Because of varying recommendations, it’s important for all men to discuss their specific prostate cancer screening needs with their physician during their annual checkup.

In some cases, genetic testing, to identify mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which increase the risk of prostate cancer, as well as the risk of breast and ovarian cancer in women, may be recommended as a risk assessment.

Prostate Cancer Treatment Options

If prostate cancer is diagnosed, treatment depends on the patient’s age, aggressiveness of the tumor and personal preference. Because prostate cancer is often slow-growing, repeat screenings and a follow-up biopsy is often the recommended option. If the cancer is more aggressive, treatment options may include surgical removal of the prostate, radiation therapy or brachytherapy, which involves placing small radioactive seeds in the prostate.

Coping with the Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Treatment

Some of the side effects of prostate cancer treatment, such as urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction (ED), can impact the quality of a man’s life. Fortunately, there are effective treatments for these side effects. Incontinence treatment options include surgical placement of a mesh sling over the urethra to hold urine back or an artificial urinary sphincter that closes down on the urethra to hold urine back. Oral medications, such as Cialis and Viagra, can help the majority of men who experience ED following treatment. Other ED treatment options include penile implants and vacuum pumps.

“There can be quality of life adjustments for some men following prostate cancer treatment,” says Dr. Kreshover. “However, women can help tremendously by providing compassionate moral support.”

Katz Institute for Women’s Health is here to answer your questions about cancer detection and prevention. Call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.

Integrative Medicine: A Holistic Approach to Healthcare

Integrative Medicine: A Holistic Approach to Healthcare

What Are the Benefits of Integrative Medicine?

Integrative medicine is about teaching healthier habits and treating the whole person and not just specific symptoms. The benefits are often far-reaching and long-lasting for patients. Integrative medicine can be an excellent tool for sustaining good health, as well as for treating chronic issues and painful or debilitating diseases and injuries.

Key Principles of Integrative Medicine

Unlike alternative medicine which refers to an approach to healing that is used in place of conventional medical therapies, integrative medicine uses all appropriate therapeutic approaches to achieve optimal health and healing. The following are some of the key principles of integrative medicine:

  • A strong partnership between patient and physician
  • Use of both conventional and alternative medicines and modalities
  • A focus on non-invasive treatments when possible
  • A clear emphasis on promoting health and illness prevention through ongoing healthy living

Combining Therapies

Over the last several decades, the popularity of combining conventional treatments with complementary therapies has grown tremendously. Patients and healthcare providers who were once skeptical of alternative treatments have become believers in the benefits of an integrative approach.

Increasingly, healthcare professionals who specialize in modern medicine are incorporating integrative medicine to promote health and wellness. By combining these approaches with conventional therapies, integrative practitioners can partner with patients and their primary healthcare providers to help relieve pain, reduce stress and support overall well-being.

And, many healthcare providers themselves use integrative approaches for their own personal healthcare because of the distinct health and wellness benefits.

“All medicine is integrative,” says Lucy P. Gade, MD, MPH, Medical Director, Center for Wellness and Integrative Medicine, Northwell Health. “By shifting from being disease-oriented to health-oriented, we can identify risks and minimize them as part of a whole person approach to healthcare. This can enable individuals to live healthier and happier lives.”

Common Integrative Health Approaches Used in Integrative Medicine

  • Deep breathing
  • Yoga
  • Tai chi or qi gong
  • Meditation
  • Massage
  • Functional nutrition
  • Homeopathy
  • Guided imagery

Want to learn more about integrative medicine? At Katz Institute for Women’s Health, we’re here to answer your questions. Call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.

colorectal cancer

Take Action to Prevent Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer doesn’t get the same amount of attention as some high-profile cancers, but it should. Many women are surprised to learn that colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the United States and the second leading cause of death from cancer. Found most often in individuals who are 50 and older, this common form of cancer is highly preventable. In fact, six out of 10 deaths from colorectal cancer could be prevented with regular screening.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Saves Lives

Screening for colorectal cancer can help find cancer at an early stage and decrease your chance of dying from it. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening colonoscopy beginning at age 50 and continuing until age 75 years. Women who are at a higher risk of developing this form of cancer should be screened at a younger age and may need more frequent screening.

The colonoscopy procedure is painless with a low risk of complications. Written instructions, provided by your doctor, prescribe a solution required to cleanse the colon. Fortunately, colonoscopy prep has improved over the years and the days of consuming large amounts of an unpleasant tasting laxative prior to the procedure are over. During the colonoscopy, your physician looks at the interior walls of the rectum and colon with a flexible, lighted tube called a colonoscope. If polyps are discovered, samples of tissue may be collected for closer examination and polyps can be removed.

“Simply put, screening colonoscopy saves lives,” says Dr. David Rivadeneira, Director of Colon and Rectal Surgery at Huntington Hospital. “Colorectal cancer is extremely prevalent, yet screening is fast and very safe with a very low complication rate.”

Colorectal Screening Tests

While colonoscopy remains the gold standard screening test for colorectal cancer, there are new tests now being introduced that use advanced DNA technology to find elevated levels of altered DNA which could be associated with cancer or pre-cancer. These tests include Cologuard, which is a single stool sample kit that patients can use at home.

Other colorectal cancer screening tests that are currently available include:

  • High-sensitivity fecal occult blood test – Checks for hidden blood in stool samples.
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy – Looks at the interior walls of the rectum and part of the colon.

It’s important to discuss with your doctor which test is best for your specific needs.

What Else Can You Do to Prevent Colorectal Cancer?

Along with getting regular screenings for colorectal cancer, there are also lifestyle decisions you can make to lower your risk.

  • Don’t smoke
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Get regular exercise
  • Drink alcohol only moderately, if not at all
  • Limit red meat, especially processed meat
  • Get the daily recommended amount of calcium and vitamin D in your diet
  • Take a multivitamin with folate

Want to learn more about colorectal cancer prevention? At Katz Institute for Women’s Health, we’re here to answer your questions. Call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist. For questions about colorectal cancer and screenings, please contact Dr. David Rivadeneira at 631-470-1450.

The Present of Presence – Mindfulness During the Holidays

The holidays are a time for celebration and gratitude. Too often, however, they’re the cause of stress and anxiety. For many, juggling the holiday tasks of shopping, decorating, cooking and social obligations can lead to feeling downright overwhelmed. However, before you’re tempted to call off the holidays altogether, you may want to try a 5,000-year-old practice that can help you get through the season and beyond. It’s mindfulness, and the power of simply being in the present moment, even for a brief period of time, can be restorative and beneficial for the body, mind and spirit.

“The everyday pressures of family and work can become even greater during the holidays,” says Dr. Lisa Langer, clinical assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine. “The ability to be present in the moment is not only a gift to others, but also to ourselves.”

Mindfulness can be as simple as just taking a few minutes each day to sit quietly and focus on breathing. This simple activity enables us to reconnect with the right here, right now and to gain clarity and focus. This is a particularly helpful tool to use when feeling overwhelmed and anxious. There are even easy-to-use apps, like Insight Timer and Calm that can help you incorporate greater mindfulness into your day-to-day life.

Make Time for Moments for Yourself and Others

Through mindfulness, many experience greater clarity of what is truly important during the holidays. And, what’s important might not be battling it out in the mall to get the latest gadget or toy. You may find that carving out quality time for family, travel or just reading a book is more important than getting the latest and greatest gift or attending a holiday party. It can be beneficial to write down your holiday intentions or share them with a friend or family member. This can help you stay on track and avoid feelings of guilt. And yes, you may need to decline an invite or say no to a family member or friend to set your limits.

“In this hyper-connected age, media can also be a big contributor to stress, especially during the holidays,” says Dr. Langer. “It can be helpful to limit time on social media and 24/7 news channels which can both increase stress and anxiety. Taking a break can help you refocus on being present for yourself and others.”

Finally, many who begin to incorporate mindfulness into their daily lives also discover the benefits of being grateful for what they have. It’s not always about having the most decorated house on the block or buying that expensive gift. Rather, it’s about being in the present moment and recognizing all that there is to be grateful for. At Katz Institute for Women’s Health, we’re grateful for the opportunity to be your healthcare provider.

The Katz Institute for Women’s Health is here to answer your questions about stress and anxiety, mindfulness and other integrative health services. For more information, call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.

holiday eating

Smart Holiday Eating Strategies

Favorite childhood memories often involve enjoying the sweets and treats of the holidays. While they’re still just as delicious when we indulge in them as adults, they can lead to unwanted, post-holiday weight gain. Navigating the dinners, desserts, parties and drinks that often go hand-in-hand with holiday celebrations can be challenging for even the most disciplined eaters. This is why many gain post-holiday pounds. One way to maintain a healthy weight throughout the year is to have smart holiday eating strategies for keeping calories in check throughout the holiday season.

“Often it’s a matter of doing simple things like not going to a party hungry that can help you avoid over-indulging during the holidays,” says Marissa Licata, MS, RD, CDN, nutritionist with the Katz Institute for Women’s Health. “While it’s always good to substitute healthier foods for richer holiday fare, making strategic decisions about how and when you eat during the holidays can make a big difference.” Licata suggests a variety of strategies for managing calorie consumption throughout the holidays. These include:

Don’t Skip Meals

We can all get busy decking the halls, shopping for gifts and getting together with friends and family. Yet, we still require the same level of nutrients during the holidays as we do the rest of the year. By ensuring we eat balanced breakfasts and lunches, we can greatly reduce our desire to overeat during a holiday event or meal.

Eat before a Party

It can be tempting to avoid eating during the day because you know they’ll be plenty of good food at a party. The reality is arriving at a celebration with an empty stomach is a surefire way to excessively snack (and be negatively impacted by the effects of alcohol). Before the party, eat a small healthy snack that will keep your appetite in check and you on track for eating right.

Bring Something Healthy to a Potluck

Making something for a potluck event is a wonderful way to showcase your culinary skills. This year, make it a point to whip up something healthy and flavorful. Not only will other party attendees appreciate your efforts, you’ll have a healthy option if your only other choices are cheese-laden spinach dip and pigs in a blanket.

Stand Away from the Buffet Table

It can be tempting to grab a handful of nuts or reach for that last canape, but you know they amount to empty calories that you don’t need. Don’t increase your temptation by standing close to the buffet. Instead, make a single trip through the line and eat only the items on your plate.

Carefully Select Your Buffet Offerings

Don’t make a seven-layer dip of everything on the buffet line. Choose only the items that you really enjoy and savor each bite. Loading a slab of prime rib on top of a collection of mini quiches, cocktail shrimp and chicken skewers will leave you feeling full and may keep you up all night with heartburn. Moderation is your friend!

Be Careful of Calorie-Laden Beverages

For many, holiday cheer involves a beverage or two. Yet, it’s very easy to consume hundreds of empty calories without even being aware of it. If you’re trying to keep weight in check throughout the season, you will want to avoid high calorie beverages like egg nog and high fat coffee drinks. Smarter options include wine spritzers, light beers, herbal teas, or even mineral water with a twist of lemon.

Stick to Your Exercise Schedule

Your calendar is booked, and you still have gifts to buy and trees to trim. During the holiday season, we’re all pressed for time, and scheduling exercise can seem next to impossible. Yet, exercise is not only necessary for keeping weight in check, it’s also a great stress reliever during this hectic time of year.

Katz Institute for Women’s Health is here to answer your questions about nutrition and healthy eating. For more information or to schedule an appointment with our nutritionist, call the Katz Institute for Women’s Health Resource Center at 855-850-5494 to speak to a women’s health specialist.